The Concordia Experience

The Concordia Experience immerses students in a rich liberal arts education grounded in the Christian faith and Luther’s vision of education as vocation. At the heart of this learning experience is the transformative search for what is good, beautiful, and true. Through an array of cross-disciplinary and integrated courses, students engage in an exploration of the human experience. They study various approaches in multiple disciplines and engage in free inquiry, critical and creative thinking, complex reasoning, and effective communications. This cluster of essential skills empowers students to meet the challenges of their entire curriculum as they transform into cultivated, ethical, and productive citizens of the world.

The Concordia Experience builds on the premise that learning is dynamic and interactive. The goals of The Concordia Experience are as follows:

  • engaging students with the Christian faith and its implications for contemporary life
  • helping students discover and/or affirm their vocation
  • enabling students to appreciate the breadth of the liberal arts and developing depth in chosen disciplines
  • nurturing appreciation for diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives
  • equipping students with skills and knowledge that promote independent and lifelong learning
  • challenging students to put theory into practice
  • inspiring students to explore new avenues for learning
  • providing opportunities for students as they work with advisors and mentors to develop an Individualized Graduation Plan and make The Concordia Experience their own

The mission and purpose of Concordia College-New York is realized through The Concordia Experience—a holistic academic endeavor in which students develop an Individualized Graduation Plan comprised of the following components:

  1. The Concordia Core
  2. Experiential Learning
  3. Majors and Minors
  4. Exploration and Enrichment Sequence
  5. Capstone Experience

I. The Concordia Core

The Foundational Core
FYE 100FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE2
ENG 110COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC3
ENG 110LWRITING LAB1
ENG 120ARGUMENT AND RHETORIC3
ENG 121INFORMATION LITERACY1
MAT 100INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (Students may be exempt from course upon successful score on math placement exam.)3
THE 101CHRISTIAN FAITH AND ETHOS3
Historical Perspective
Select one of the following3
GLOBAL HISTORY
AMERICAN HISTORY I
AMERICAN HISTORY II
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
Human Experience
Select one of the following:3
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
ELEMENTS OF SOCIOLOGY
Creative Expression
Select one of the following:3
AESTHETICS: LIVING W/THE ARTS
FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC
INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA
Quantitative Analysis
Select one of the following:3
MAT 120
INTRO PROBABILITY & STATISTICS
PRECALCULUS
CALCULUS I
Literature and Rhetoric
Select one from the designated ENG 2XX courses3
Scientific Inquiry
Select one of the following:3
SCIENCE IN CONTEXT
BIOLOGY I
HEREDITY AND SOCIETY
FOODS AND NUTRITION
HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I
HUMAN SEXUALITY
Theological Understanding3
Select one from the designated THE 2XX or 3XX courses
World Cultures
Select one of the following:3
WORLD ART
WORLD LITERATURE
May not be used if already selected for Literature and Rhetoric
WORLD MUSIC
NMC 234
WORLD RELIGIONS
May not be used if already selected for Theological Understanding
Total Hours40

Please reference Degree Works  for specific requirements associated with the Concordia Core.

II. Experiential Learning (EXL)

Experiential Learning engages students in opportunities to extend learning activities beyond the traditional classroom. At Concordia, Experiential Learning (EXL) is a supervised learning model designed to integrate formal learning and personal experience through a cycle of knowledge/preparation, activity/experience, and reflection/review. Methods for EXL may include independent learning, problem-solving, project work, activity participation, field work, community placement, prior learning, leadership opportunities and/or training, creative performances, service learning, and personal development. Students will earn no fewer than 6 credits in EXL as part of their 122-credit graduation requirement. Refer to your program advisor for EXL requirements within your degree.

All transfer students are required to earn no fewer than 3 EXL credits. Credits may be earned in one-, two-, or three-credit opportunities which vary from semester to semester. No more than half of these credits may be earned in on-campus opportunities. EXL opportunities may include internships, field work, study abroad, service learning, city-as-text, study trips, and independent research. Descriptions of specific EXL opportunities for credit offered in a given semester are provided in the syllabus. Students may freely elect to fulfill the EXL requirement by engaging in opportunities not directly connected to their program, and they are encouraged to make choices that are fully integrated with their Individualized Graduation Plan.

III. Degree Programs

Concordia’s Degree Programs represent the dimension of depth in a student’s academic focus. Specific requirements for each degree are found on subsequent pages of this section of the Catalog. Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved programs may jeopardize a student’s eligibility for certain student aid awards. The following degree programs are registered by the New York State Education Department:

Master Degree Programs

  • HEGIS/Classification of Instructional Program Code
  • Master of Science in Business Leadership (0506.00/52.0213) M.S.
  • Master of Arts in Digital Media (1099) M.A.
  • Master of Science in Digital Marketing (0509) M.S.
  • Master of Science in Education Early Childhood Special Education (0808.00/13.1015) M.S.Ed.
  • Master of Science in Education Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (1508.00/13.1401) M.S.Ed.
  • Master of Science in General/Special Childhood Education (0808.00/13.1001) M.S.Ed.
  • Master of Science in Leadership (0599.00/52.0213) M.S.

Post-Baccalaureate Programs

  • (HEGIS/Classification of Instructional Program Code)
  • Nursing (1203.00/51.3801) B.S.

Bachelor Degree Programs

  • (HEGIS/Classification of Instructional Programs Code)
  • Behavioral Science (4901.00/45.0101) B.A.
  • Biology (0401.00/26.0101) B.A.
  • Business Administration (0506.00/52.0201) B.S.
  • Childhood Education (0802.00/13.1202) B.A.
  • Criminal Justice (2209.00/43.0103) B.A.
  • Educational Services(0801.00/13.0101) B.A
  • Early Childhood Education (0823.00/13.1210) B.A.
  • Health Care Administration (1202.00/510701) B.S.
  • Health Studies (1201.00/51.0000) B.S.
  • Interdisciplinary Studies (4901.00/24.0101) B.A.
  • Judeo-Christian Heritage (1510.00/38.0201) B.A.
  • Mathematics (1701.00/27.01010 B.a.a
  • Middle Childhood Generalist Education (0804.00/13.1203) B.A.
  • Nursing (1203.00/51.1699) B.S.
  • Psychology (2001) B.A.
  • Radiologic Technologies/Science (1225.00/51.0911) B.S.
  • RN Completion Program (1203.10/51.1699) B.S.
  • Social Sciences (2201.00/45.0101) B.A.
  • Social Work (2104.00/44.0701) B.S.

Associate Degree Programs

  • (HEGIS/Classification of Instructional Programs Code)
  • Business Administration (5004.00/52.0201) A.A.S.
  • Liberal Arts (5649.00/24.0101) A.A.

Teacher Certification Programs

  • Concordia College is authorized to recommend the awarding of New York State initial certification to students who complete one of the following programs:
  • Early Childhood Education (Birth-Grade 2) (0823.00/13.1210)
  • Childhood Education (Grades 1-6) (0802.00/13.1202)
  • Middle Childhood Education Generalist (Grades 5-9) (0804.00/13.1203)

IV. Exploration and Enrichment Sequence

The Exploration and Enrichment Sequence is comprised of those credits, normally about 40, that remain after satisfying the requirements of the Concordia Core and your Academic Major. The purpose of the Exploration and Enrichment Sequence is to encourage:

  1. enrichment through support courses and electives for the program of study
  2. realization of personal goals
  3. exploration of personal interests
  4. exploration of post-graduation objectives
  5. development of a sense of vocation and social responsibility

The Exploration and Enrichment Sequence consists of academic requirements that enhance the Individualized Graduation Program. Includes the possibility of a double program of study and/or involvement in the Fellows Program of the College, as well as other experience-related items such as field work, volunteer activities, athletic involvement, activity involvement, summer employment, summer study, study abroad, portfolio development, and internships.

Collaborative Advanced Studies

In a partnership between Concordia College-New York and Valparaiso University (Valparaiso, IN), Concordia New Media undergraduates can gain early entry to Valparaiso’s Graduate Program in Digital Media or Sports Media and take graduate classes in their fourth year at Concordia.

  • Master of Science in Digital Media
  • Master of Science in Sports Media
  • Master of International Commerce and Policy

V. Capstone Course/Experience

The Capstone course/experience is required of all Concordia students and typically takes place in the final semester within their specific program/major. For undergraduate students, it involves a project that integrates knowledge and skills from the courses in the major, the Exploration and Enrichment Sequence, and The Concordia Core. This project will demonstrate that Concordia graduates have achieved the goals of The Concordia Experience as outlined in this Catalog. For the Capstone Course/Experience in your Program/Major, see the Degree Programs section.

Rubrics for the Concordia Undergraduate Capstone Course/Experience

  1. The capstone course/experience usually takes place in the Senior Year and may be a one- or two semester course/experience.
  2. The minimum credit for a capstone course/experience is 3 credits and the maximum is 6.
  3. The capstone course/experience will feature a written proposal, which demonstrates breadth and depth (Core and Major goals), that must be formally endorsed by the academic program faculty.
  4. The WAC course must be a pre- or co-requisite to the Capstone course/experience.
  5. The project/experience must be connected to a course (it might be a course in itself or might be an extra-credit project arising from a 300- or 400-level course).
  6. The capstone course/experience must include a measurable product—Paper/Project/Portfolio/Performance—which demonstrates the Writing Process and meets Concordia’s Writing Standard.
  7. Part of the project, when appropriate, will include a public presentation.
  8. The capstone course/experience, wherever possible, will have an external evaluation.
  9. Each School will have the flexibility of adjusting their specific needs to the aforementioned.

Writing Across the Curriculum

A distinctive mark of an educated person is the ability to think critically. That ability is significantly devel­oped and demonstrated by writing (planning, generating sentences, and revising). To promote students’ development as effective thinkers and writers, the faculty adopted a “Standard of Writing” and established Writing Across the Curriculum.

Standards of Writing for Concordia Students

The criteria for evaluating written communication include: subject matter, use of rhetorical modes, organization and development, mechanics, and style or expression.

  1. The subject matter of an effective written communication is relevant and accurate. At its best, the handling of subject matter will both demonstrate what the writer has learned and be instructive.
  2. Rhetorical modes: Effective written communication reflects the ability to illustrate, compare, and contrast, analyze, define, and argue.
  3. An effective written communication is well organized and well developed. The purpose is clearly indicated. The thesis is clearly stated and amply supported by facts, examples, and illustrations. The writer uses paragraphing appropriate to logical division and organization of ideas. Sentences are constructed to communicate correctly the logical relations of the ideas in the sentences.
  4. Effective communication is relatively errorless in mechanics. The mechanics of writing include cor­rect usage of standard English grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax, and the accepted usage for numbers, abbreviations, italics, and general format.
  5. The style or expression of an effective written communication is engaging and contains fluent transi­tions, tight and fresh phrasing, varied sentence structure, and a tone that enhances the purpose.

By the end of their third year, the student should be competent in items 1 through 4. The student should be developing a more refined sense of style (item 5) during their third and fourth years. The above ap­plies to any form of written communication (essays, exams, reports, business communications, research writing).

Effective written communication of research contains additional characteristics. The writing:

  1. reflects the ability to choose and evaluate source materials;
  2. shows appropriate use (as to choice and length) of direct quotation when citing sources. The writing manifests appropriate and accurate use of the paraphrase and the summary;
  3. demonstrates a synthesis of original ideas based on an understanding of sources; and
  4. uses each discipline’s adopted format for documentation.
Designated Writing Process Courses (WAC)
ART 3503
BIO 330TOPICS IN BIO & CHEM3
BUS 336ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR3
EDU 329READING/LANGUAGE ARTS ELEM II3
HIS 216AMERICAN HISTORY II3
MAT 311MATHEMATICAL THOUGHT/METHODS3
MUS 3023
NUR 341CONTEMPORARY ISSUES/NURSING2
SOC 330TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY3
SWK 322SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I4
ENG 381
NMC 341REAL WORLD: BUSINESS/NEW MEDIA3
PSY 351COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY3
RAD 281LAW AND ETHICS3
HEA 281LEGAL&ETHICAL ASPECTS HLTH CAR3
THE 332ISSUES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT3
CRJ 330POLICING DIVERSE COMMUNITIES3

Information Knowledge Across the Curriculum

Concordia College’s approach to information literacy parallels the philosophical underpinning of the Col­lege’s Writing Across the Curriculum. Specifically, the College supports an approach that integrates writing and, in this case, the access and use of information throughout the curriculum. This model intentionally builds on knowledge and skills students develop as they progress through The Concordia Experience-Liberal Arts Core.

Information Knowledge Across the Curriculum Model has a multi-level approach:

  1. Information Literacy–the ability to use the library to find basic information (first-year through ENG 121 INFORMATION LITERACY)
  2. Information Competency–the ability to evaluate and use information (second/third years through discipline-specific course)
  3. Information Fluency–the ability to synthesize and integrate information from a variety of sources (fourth year through the capstone)

Designated Information Competency Courses
BIO 414BIO: HISTORY/PROCESS/METHODS3-4
BUS 336ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR3
EDU 272CLASSRM APPS/INSTR TECHNOLOGY3
ENG 213INTRODUCTION TO POETRY3
HEA 234HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT3
HIS 3143
or SOC 314
MAT 2463
MUS 3013
NUR 431RESEARCH/THEORY/EVIDENCE-NURS3
NMC 3313
SWK 311SOCIAL WELFARE/SOCIAL INSTITUT3
THE 332ISSUES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT3